When Manchester United called Anfield home / When outfield players go in goal

In 1971, Manchester United played a “home” game at Anfield, and the controversies surrounding the match would echo for decades. An Action Replay retro feature on an unusually historic clash.

Anfield is only 30 miles from Old Trafford, but for Manchester United fans it may as well be the dark side of the moon. Yet, on one uncomfortable August evening in 1971, and with Old Trafford closed because of crowd trouble, United called Liverpool’s ground home for one remarkable league encounter against reigning champions Arsenal. But rather than acting as a deterrent as the FA had intended, the fixture actually served as a template for the hooligan woes that would blight football through the 1970s and beyond.

Also in this issue of FourFourTwo:

An outfield player going in goal is a rare treat, but in football’s early days it was a regular occurrence. I wrote the history section of this feature on outfielders in goal.

An outfield player going in goal is a rare treat, but in football’s early days it was a regular occurrence. The original Laws of the Game, drawn up by the Football Association back in 1863, made no distinction between outfielders and goalkeepers and allowed any player to stop the ball with his hands – meaning teams could effectively play ‘last man back’ or ‘rush goalie’. It wasn’t until 1871 that the rules were updated to outlaw handling of the ball except by a designated goalkeeper.

Read both features in the April 2017 issue of FourFourTwo.

 

Paul Brown

Hello. I am a writer called Paul Brown. This is my website. It's basically a portfolio of recent work, plus an outlet to post quick pieces and plug my books. I write about football history, extraordinary true stories, and all kinds of other stuff. For more info please see my about page or contact me.