Football Wikipedia

When your club is linked with a player you’ve never heard of, Wikipedia’s 350,000+ football pages are likely to contain all the information you need. But who updates those goal tallies? And more importantly, why? For FourFourTwo, I met the men who keep football Wikipedia bang up to date.

 

Football chants

As part of FourFourTwo’s 50 Best Football Chants special, why do Liverpool fans sing You’ll Never Walk Alone, why do West Ham fans sing I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles, and why on Earth do Stoke City fans sing Delilah (a creepy murder ballad about an insane voyeur who knifes his cheating lover to death)?

 

Half-time: a history

Footballers haven’t always had 15 minutes to catch their breath. The original Laws of the Game included no reference to half-time, and instead required teams to change ends after each goal was scored. A short piece on the history of half-time for FourFourTwo.

 

History of the magic sponge

The magic sponge is one of football’s most familiar artefacts, having being variously applied to players’ bumps and bruises for more than a hundred years. This is the story of how a cold wet sponge became regarded in football as an apparently miraculous cure for virtually any injury.

 

The real Escape to Victory

In 1914, at the outbreak of the First World War, several of Britain’s most famous footballers were imprisoned in the brutal Ruhleben internment camp, on the outskirts of Berlin. Surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards, they found freedom in the thing they knew best: football.